No.49 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

A bladder tumour may or may not be cancerous. Most bladder tumours grow on the bladder lining and are therefore easy to treat using a special telescope and ‘key-hole’ surgery.Read more

No.50 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

This page is designed to help you check your skin correctly. This needs to be done routinely at 4-6 weekly intervals.Read more

No.47 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Checking the lymph nodes once a month is sufficient and this can be done at the same time as you check your skin for any changing moles. Checking them more often may result in difficulty noticing any change.Read more

No.29 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

If treated whilst in the earliest stages of development, malignant melanoma can be cured. However, if left, this form of skin cancer may spread to other areas of the body (metastasise) when it may prove more difficult to cure.Read more

No.28 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Basal Cell Carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer. Over 50,000 new cases are reported each year in the U.K.Read more

No.27 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Squamous Cell Carcinoma (S.C.C.) is the second most common form of skin cancer. If left untreated, S.C.C.s have the ability to spread to other organs of the body (metastasise), although this is rare.Read more

No.61 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

These guidelines should help reduce the risk of developing food related infections while you are at risk of neutropenia.Read more

No.60 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Tiredness is a common problem during illness and treatment, as well as during times of stress or worry.Read more

No.59 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

A poor appetite can be a side effect of cancer, treatment or medication. Being stressed or anxious can also affect your appetite.Read more

No.58 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

This advice should help you improve your energy levels and keep your strength up.Read more

No.57 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Indigestion or heartburn can cause pain and discomfort which may make eating more difficult.Read more

No.56 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Diarrhoea can be due to a number of factors including treatment, medication, infection, stress or anxiety.Read more

No.55 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Changes in taste may be related to illness or can be a side effect of treatment. It is usually temporary and should improve once treatment has finished and you are well.Read more

No.54 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

If you are losing weight or struggling to eat, try having nourishing drinks and snacks throughout the day.Read more

No.53 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Nausea, with or without vomiting, can be a common side effect of cancer treatment. You may also feel sick if you are anxious or emotionally upset.Read more

No.52 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

A dry, sore or coated mouth may be related to your illness or a side effect of your cancer treatment. You may find that this affects your taste and can make eating uncomfortable.Read more

No.51 in a series of Help Yourself Leaflets

Constipation may be due to a number of causes including poor fluid intake, reduced physical activity, medication and treatment or a change in eating habits.Read more